Amplifying Experts in Your Company (LCC 02 – E 02)

LCC 2 - Amplifying Experts in Your Company

In this highlight from the round table discussion, the learning leaders discuss how to amplify experts in your company.

Transcript to Follow Along

Andrew Barry

Celine, I want to bring you in here because you told me about this thing you do the someone like me series and this concept of guiding nodes. And it’s sort of, you know, this made me think of that, that it’s this more lightweight sort of, you know, it’s not a huge big programme thing, but something that people can can learn from others in the organisation, do you want to share a bit more about that?

Celine Jeremiah

I’d love to you, we actually just had that last week. So you have really good timing on bringing it up. And I’ll bring everyone up to speed real quick. So we have our orientation, our week long orientation, which is now virtual, completely virtual is called x school. And we have various sessions throughout each of the days. And on the final day, we added a new session that I facilitated, which was called becoming in last session, and it was an AMA with what we called guiding nodes. And they were last ditions, who have been at elastic for anywhere from one to three years. And they basically just talked about their experience and what has helped them become successful last sessions. And there was an AMA sheet that the x schoolers got to fill out and ask whatever questions they wanted. And we kind of just facilitated answering those questions in a live panel with all of those guiding nodes. And I think it was a really cool experience, because not only where the school was super excited to be able to talk to patients who have kind of been there done that and are really experiencing what they’re about to experience. But it was also something that this kind of surprised me a little bit was so so appreciated by the guiding nodes themselves. And they were so happy and excited to share. And it was just so cool to see them light up when they got to talk about something that they had learned. So it was a really win win on both sides. And I think that to Andy’s point, that was definitely them reflecting on some of the things that they’ve learned. So it was a learning experience for them as well.

Andrew Barry

And how much easier is it to learn from your peer or someone who’s like just one step ahead of you, right? That’s a very cool thing. So what like how did you set that up? Like, how formal is it? How often do you run it?

Celine Jeremiah

Yeah, so we just we just started. So this was our first one, we’ll definitely keep doing it, because we got some really good feedback. But how we did actually I didn’t bring that in. So thank you for asking how we set it up was these individuals, we wanted to think of a way to choose them strategically in a way that also motivates people to keep sharing their story. So our talent brand team has this series called someone like me. And it’s basically blogs that have people out elastic sharing their story and sharing how they’ve used their own uniqueness as an advantage of elastic. So one of the speakers, for example, has an accent. And she Um, I think I called her blog excelling with an accent. And she kind of wrote about how she’s used her culture and her communication to help her connect with people as being someone with an accent. And so we chose people who Britain someone like me blogs, and actually at the end of the AMA that we just had for x school. I did encourage the x schoolers you know, you’ve seen this now we would love for some of you to become diagnosed for the next school. And how they can do that is by writing a someone like me blog and then from there, we can choose the people for the next round.

Andrew Barry

Yeah, so when

Alec Miller

I’m sorry, Andrew,

Andrew Barry

No go for it.

Alec Miller

The someone like me blog, is that an internal only thing? Or do you share that out on with the elastic.com website or?

Celine Jeremiah

It’s on our website. Let me get the link and I can show you.

Alec Miller

Yeah, I love to at the old company, I work for NCR, we had something like that, where we were trying to get employees to blog about their experience at NCR. And it kind of fell flat. After the first couple months, we were doing really well. We had, you know, our main trendsetters, or whatever you call influencers, right? Who were totally all about, I’ll go that extra mile and write a 300 word blah, blah, blah. But then after like the first couple months of like, we got those people it was it went like it, and I was like pulling teeth to try to get people to like write something. And always the same excuses is what we’re dealing with right now. I don’t have time. I don’t have time for that. Um, so I’m just wondering, like, have you been doing this for a long time? Is it continued on successfully? if so how did you continue to get people to do it? Yeah,

Celine Jeremiah

yeah, it’s a good question. And I think part of that was the cross functional involvement that was involved that made it a little easier. And the talent brand team has had this blog series for a while. So there are still several folks who have already written blogs that we could kind of pull on if we don’t get anyone new, but I’m hoping we do get at least one or two new people from the most recent x school. And I think that man the How do you get people to continue doing that? I think that some of it is seizing opportunity. And some of it is kind of continuing to build the same culture, we were pretty strong. And I would say the top red team gets credit for this is pretty strategic about when there is something exciting that people would be able to or would kind of motivate them. I mean, there’s been a lot that’s happened this year, for example. And so that has been a huge motivator and being like, hey, like, for these reasons, we encourage you to share your story, and kind of having a forum to link people if they want to share someone like me blog. And I don’t know if there’s I’m curious to hear what everyone else thinks because I don’t know that there’s one right answer to that.

Andy Spector

More of a, I guess, a question or comment. I mean, if you think about it, do people post on Twitter, people post on Instagram, people post on Facebook? Right, they keep the keep posting? I’m gonna ask this question. Why do you think they keep posting on Facebook, Twitter, all everybody posts

Alec Miller

so they can get likes?

Lisa O’Donnell

attention? Yeah.

Alec Miller

we all we all want that dopamine thing that says somebody like to write that. Yeah. I hate to say it, I hate to boil it down to simplicity. But that’s what it is, in my opinion.

Andy Spector

Okay, then why do you think they’re not posting on juice box and things like that?

Alec Miller

Because they don’t get likes. Right? So they do all this work? And then and then it’s like, for what? So it only almost makes me think when Celine was saying I would love to hear what other ideas we have. I look back over here where Andrew said extrinsic. Yeah, things are gamification in rewards. If I give somebody a free meal at their favourite restaurant, every time they write a blog, I bet I’d get 50 bucks tomorrow, you know, but am I then like motivating them the wrong way? You know, saying like that, then I’m like, forcing them to write something.

Andy Spector

I’m going to give you an example. And if you ever read Daniel Pink’s drive, have you anyone read that? So there’s the scenario, he opens the book up enough, you guys. So rageous, 1995. Right. There’s two encyclopaedias out there. There’s one that’s backed by a huge company, and they pay millions of dollars for for experts. And then there’s one that starts a few years later, that’s people just go and their own free time and start creating content. Now, if you ask anybody traditionally, which one would succeeded people would have back to the company. And what I’m talking about is Microsoft Encarta. Other ones, we’re talking about what you eat. And yet people are still contribute to Wikipedia. So and the whole book is all about intrinsic motivation. And what’s sustainable, right. So I just want to share that as an example, where extrinsic motivation has not didn’t work. It didn’t work in that example, or in a traditionally way it works in the short term, but not in the long term. So how do you enable autonomy mastery purpose?

Andrew Barry

Yeah, I think that’s

Alec Miller

right. Yeah, go ahead.

Andrew Barry

No, I’m gonna welcome Masha in a second, but let’s just wrap up this thought, because it’s actually perfect timing. Marsha have a lot to contribute to the second topic as well.

Yeah, Alec, finish your thought there, because you have.

Alec Miller

Oh, I mean, Andy, you’re so right. You just nailed me. I use the Google crowdsourcing app all the time. All it is, is me helping their machine learning. And what do they give me? points that don’t mean anything, nothing I in Well, I don’t do it for the points or the level of Google, I do it because I enjoy participating in something that I think creates a greater good. So when I help it, understands what pictures are people and what pictures are sheep. I know that 10 years from now, when I take a picture of a sheep, it’s gonna really say that’s not a person. I don’t know, I but I personally enjoy that. But how do I find that personal enjoyment for everybody else? like reading this book now? Yeah, it was different.

Andy Spector

I think the problem is we try as companies, we try to force things like we have an agenda, right? Like, there’s always there’s always something there. I think if we were more about again, being human centric, we I think we would do a better job and understand human nature, I think we’d be better off and designing programmes that meet people, and then really understand all the different groups and working with them. So that’s why I love I love the idea of crowdsourcing, for example, and having people share their own ideas, right, and having ownership there. So I think those are some examples. But I know

Andrew Barry

I love all these points, because you guys are touching on this thing you may have seen that I’ve been writing about it recently, quite a bit is this flywheel where people learn from each other, we talked about that there’s peer to peer learning, and then you get experts and selenia guys are doing this amazing job at identifying who those experts are. And then then the final one is teachers and teachers are experts who get joy out of sharing their knowledge, right, like for whatever that is, and that’s the intrinsic stuff we’ve been talking about. I gotta do that feel like you’re contributing to this greater good and and i wonder Like, yeah, you know, I’m familiar with KPMG. And you know, maybe it’s the same in PwC, I think, Alec concilium, you guys come from pretty different type companies. And it’s like, how do you how do you get those people where they actually see value in their time? Helping others like that they are contributing to greater good.

Marsha, feel free to jump in as well, if you have any thoughts.

Marsha Parker

Yeah, you know, so I did some research on the role of an online facilitator in my dissertation. And what I realised is that the role of the facilitator has to flip they have to see it as flipped. So they become this guide and coach instead of this know it all impress person that has all infinite knowledge. And I tried this in my online classes, and it works. If I allow the the control to be not from the instructor, but from the students, I get so much richer dialogue and discussion than if I lead the discussion. So I let them start it off and get the ball rolling, and I only guide them. So it’s like bumpers on the bowling alley. It’s kind of like I steer them in this direction. But I don’t give them those insights that they come to. And it’s so much more of a richer online experience than it is if it’s guided by somebody who’s a facilitator that my role is to regurgitate knowledge and get you to act on these principles. Yeah, that’s, that’s a very different role and aspect than what we’re used to. in academia and in corporate.

Andrew Barry

Yeah. It’s what Andy is saying like about the, like, the agenda, and I come in with his agenda. So was that a leap for you, Martian? And but once we’re done with this, I’m going to get you to introduce yourself? Oh, yeah,

Marsha Parker

Sure, sure. I do know what it wasn’t a leap, because I had did a lot of research on it. And more has a lot of stuff on this about the three levels of interaction as required in any kind of online, you know, environment, you got to have peer to peer, peer to instructor and instructor to the class or the peers. If any one of those are weak, then you have no, you will see participation slide off and people’s interest with this dissipate. I don’t think it’s hard. I think it’s hard sometimes when instructors who have not created their own content, who’s probably regurgitating who’s not really versed in some of the content in certain areas to do that, because then they’re not seen as an expert or guide on the on the side, you know, but if I’m up, you know, your craft, you’re willing to let go of that control. So you can get that epiphany. That’s, that’s just my perspective.

Andrew Barry

That’s such a good point. Anybody else have a thought on that?

Alec Miller

I just want to ask Marsha Did you say was the motor program or something like that?

Marsha Parker

More, more is a theorist it’s called constructivism. And it’s kind of a learner-centred. What we’re trying to do before was like learner-centric content and curriculum and are driving from a learner’s perspective.

 

 

LCC 2 - Amplifying Experts in Your Company
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